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Ingmar Bergman wrote the first line of his biography Lanterna Magica “When I was born in July 1918, mother had the Spanish flu and I was also in such a bad state that we urgently baptised me in the hospital.” So began the life of a director considered one of the greatest in the history of cinema. As a tribute to his works and to celebrate his 100th anniversary, we are pleased to present three films in the beloved movie theatre of his childhood.

Léon Morin, priest

  • Léon Morin, priest
    Saturday November 24, 12H30
    Léon Morin, priest

    Léon Morin, priest

    By Jean-Pierre Melville

    Saturday November 24, 12H30

  • In selecting this film, we evoke one of Bergman's favorite themes: the spiritual quest. In the autumn of 1961, Bergman began the production of Winter Light (Nattvardsgästerna), which shows the painful relationship of a priest, Tomas Ericsson, with an atheist woman, Märta. Unlike Tomas Ericsson, who has lost his faith, Léon Morin keeps asserting it against the disapproving opinion of the members of his congregation. [Melville's film was shown for the first time in Sweden on April 23, 1971 on TV1, today’s SVT1 . Both films reflect the profound existential crisis experienced by many of their contemporaries.

The big day

  • The big day
    Sunday November 25, 20H15
    The big day

    The big day

    By Jacques Tati

    Sunday November 25, 20H15

  • A movie he appreciated dearly. Even though he is sometimes perceived as a stern author, Bergman always loved both the comical power and the poesy of the burlesque cinema, of which Tati was an extraordinary representative. Bergman himself experienced the genre in All these women (För att inte tala om alla dessa kvinnor). In 1947, when The Big Day was released, Bergman directed his third film L'éternel Mirage (Skepp till India land). He was only 29 years old.